National Poutine Day

National Poutine Day is observed next on Sunday, March 5th, 2023 (245 days from today).

How many days until National Poutine Day?

National

Poutine is a dish originating from the countryside of Quebec in Canada. If people mention Canada, people will immediately think of falling red maple leaves filled with sugar and if they mention Canadian cuisine, the dish they refer to is definitely Poutine. Not fussy, ornate or made from unique expensive materials, these dishes bring unprecedented flavors that no one can refuse. This is a diverse dish in Canada or it can be mentioned that this is the traditional dish of this country. It is even said that you are not Canadian if you have never eaten Poutine. In recognition of this national poutine, April 11 each year is recognized as National Poutine Day, which is celebrated to honor and further popularize this famous Canadian dish.

Poutine is one of the famous dishes of Canada, if not a typical dish of the country of maple leaves, Poutine consists of French fries, cheese curds and meat sauce (gravy).

The taste of Poutine comes from the meat sauce. The meat sauce is described that this is cooked from chicken tenderly and not too thick, mildly spicy with pepper and a little salty, this is the traditional Canadian cooking method. When cooking can be combined with sauce brune, a combination of chicken broth and beef juice.

Today, Poutine Sauce is available in supermarkets in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime region as a prepackaged powder or in jars and cans. Water on the market usually has 2 main types, one is from a well-known processing brand, the other is a homemade version. Vegetarian versions of the sauce is also served at many restaurants.

The meat sauce in the poutine is not exactly the same as other sauces because of the cheese curds that come with it. This layer of cheese is melted, having a structure similar to mozzarella after being put into the reheater. The potatoes in the Poutine dish are cut quite thick, and that is a unique feature of the poutine. Potatoes are fried twice so that the outside is crispy and the inside is soft. To preserve the crispiness of the potatoes, the sauce and cheese are only added just before serving. Dishes when served to guests are poured into deep hollow paper boxes or small baskets to keep the required temperature for the dishes.

History of Canadian Poutine

Canadian poutine is associated with many different stories. Poutine dish was born with the most official version associated with the following legend:

Canadians say that in the 1950s at a restaurant called "Le Lutin qui rit" in Warwick, Quebec, poutine was created. After a diner loved adding cheese curd to his fries, restaurant owner Fernand Lachance said "Ça va faire une maudite poutine", which roughly translates to "Do it like that". It's going to make a terrible mess."

Poutine is synonymous with mess in English. Since then, Poutine was born, this dish is associated with the cuisine of the Quebec region, Canada.

Today, Poutine is the most popular and typical dish of Canadians, you can find this dish with many different versions anywhere in Canada. Every year, an anniversary day dedicated to this dish is held in major cities such as Ottawa, Drummondville, Quebec City, Montreal, and Toronto...

This is a Canadian dish but influenced by French cuisine with French fries, the famous French fries.

In Newfoundland, for example, many restaurants in this area have come up with their own signature poutine, which still includes meat sauce and fries, but substitutes cheese for a special sauce and some mix other accompanying

Convenient and versatile poutine you can eat in fast food stores, restaurants, mobile food trucks on the road, sports stadiums, pubs...

Observing National Poutine Day

To enjoy the most authentic Poutine, you should enjoy it at restaurants in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. However, today there are many restaurants that absorb the essence of this dish and also have excellent quality.

This dish is so loved by Canadians that McDonald's in Canada has put the name Poutine on its menu. In 2014, a restaurant called Joe Beeverz in the Canadian province of Manitoba created the world's largest plate of poutine, breaking the previous world record set by the people of Saguenay, Quebec. Joe Beeverz's Poutine Plate weighed 1,949 pounds, and 800 pounds more than the previous record.

Besides, you can also make your own poutine with a traditional recipe or make it according to the recipe you add. If you still don't know how to make poutine, you can try following the recipe below:

Ingredient

2 medium potatoes

2 wedges semi-whole cheese

250 ml of water

1 tablespoon flour

1 tablespoon meat concentrate. Bovril fever.

1 meat concentrate

200 ml of frying oil

A little salt

A pinch of ground black pepper

Perform

Step 1: Make our gravy sauce. In a small saucepan, add 250 ml of water and a tablespoon of meat concentrate. We cook in a water bath until the tablets are dissolved.

Step 2: Add a tablespoon of flour and stir quickly so that it dissolves and leaves as few lumps as possible. Pass the sauce through a sieve and make the sauce smooth and soft by remove lumps.

Step 3: Return to heat the sauce and add the tablespoon of meat concentrate. Cook it for two minutes and set aside.

Step 4: Potatoes will be peeled and cut into medium squares. Fry in a pan with oil. Wait until the potatoes turn golden brown, take them out on a plate and sprinkle some salt.

Step 5: Place cheese slices on top while potatoes are still warm. Pour the hot sauce mixture over the top so the cheese can melt a little. Then sprinkle some black pepper on top.

So you have delicious poutine at home. Share your poutine on social media using the hashtag #NationalPoutineDay to celebrate National Poutine day.

Observed

National Poutine Day has been observed annually on March 5th.

Dates

Friday, March 5th, 2021

Saturday, March 5th, 2022

Sunday, March 5th, 2023

Tuesday, March 5th, 2024

Wednesday, March 5th, 2025

Founded by

Danny Rodriguez in 2014

Also on Sunday, March 5th, 2023

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